Decorative Lanterns

Copts, Islamists and Jews: gender, minorities, hybridity (and its limits) in two novellas by Bahaa Abdelmegid

09May 16

Sarah Irving

Abstract: Bahaa Abdelmegid’s novellas Saint Theresa and Sleeping with Strangers feature a range of intertwined relations: sexual, commercial, as neighbours, and as colleagues between Jews, Christians and Muslims in Egyptian society since 1967. I argue that Abdelmegid’s Egyptian masculine is fragile, brittle, and under threat from a dissolute West and an extremist and inauthentic Islam. Continue reading →

Review of Mansour Nasasra, Sophie Richter-Devroe, Sarab Abu-Rabia-Queder & Richard Ratcliffe (Eds), The Naqab Bedouin and Colonialism: New Perspectives

03May 16

Reviewed by Thayer Hastings

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Review of J. M. N. Jeffries and William Mathew (ed.), The Palestine Deception, 1915-23: The McMahon-Hussein Correspondence, the Balfour Declaration, and the Jewish National Home

24Nov 15

Reviewed by Nadia Naser-Najjab Continue reading →

‘Strategies of Recognition’ and Palestinian Immigrant Women’s Dress: Forging Communities and Negotiating Power Relations

03Nov 15

Enaya Othman

Abstract: This paper examines the narratives of twenty-two Palestinian immigrant women who settled in the Milwaukee area in order to demonstrate the particular ways in which they used their dress as a means to claim places of importance and exert influence in their communities. Continue reading →

Democracy, Human Rights, and Islamic Family Law in Post-Soeharto Indonesia

28May 15

Mark Cammack, Adriaan Bedner, and Stijn van Huis

Abstract: This article examines the developments in Indonesian family law in the aftermath of the political transition that occurred in 1998. Its focus is on the position of the Islamic courts and the role of the women’s movement as a driver of reform. Continue reading →

Framing Rights: Women and Family Law in Pre- and Post- Revolutionary Iran

27May 15

Arzoo Osanloo

Abstract: This article explores changes to Iran’s family law codes before and after the 1979 revolution. Since the revolution, the state’s attention to women’s legal status has served to reinforce specific and often competing views on women’s roles in the post-revolutionary Islamic Republic of Iran. Continue reading →

Women’s Rights in Tunisia and the Democratic Renegotiation of an Authoritarian Legacy

22May 15

Maaike Voorhoeve

Abstract: Since the 2011 revolution, Tunisia has been negotiating what it is to become, a process of rebirth in which women’s rights is key. The ongoing debates reflect a confrontation between the feminist policies of Habib Bourguiba (the first president of the Tunisian republic) and alternative notions of women’s rights. Continue reading →

A Revolution in Muslim Family Law? Egypt’s Pre- and Post-Revolutionary Period (2011-2013) Compared

20May 15

Nadia Sonneveld and Monika Lindbekk

Abstract: In the weeks following the Egyptian revolution of 2011, a group of divorced fathers rose to demand a “revolution in family law.” Portraying extant family law provisions as symbolic of the old regime and as deviating from the principles of shariʿa, their call was given prominent media attention and, in the ensuing transitional period (2011 to 2013), women’s rights and family law emerged as contentious areas in Egypt. Continue reading →

Introduction: Shariʿa in Revolution? A Comparative Overview of Pre- and Post-Revolutionary Developments in Shariʿa-Based Family Law Legislation in Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, and Tunisia

19May 15

Nadia Sonneveld

Editor’s Note: Over the next two weeks, NMES will publish a series of articles about the relationship between family law and revolution in Egypt, Tunisia, Indonesia, and Iran. Nadia Sonneveld edited this series and she also introduces it in the following article.

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Review of Liat Kozma, Cyrus Schayegh, and Avner Wishnitzer (eds.), A Global Middle East: Mobility, Materiality and Culture in the Modern Age, 1880-1940

12May 15

Reviewed by Solaiman M. Fazel Continue reading →