History

Pockets of Privilege: A Historical, Spatial, and Political Economy Analysis of Industrial Zones in Palestine

16Mar 17

Rohan Advani

Abstract: This article argues that industrial zones in Palestine do not effectively promote Palestinian economic development. The article rests on a historical, spatial, and economic analysis of the political economy of industrial zones in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Continue reading →

Democracy, Human Rights, and Islamic Family Law in Post-Soeharto Indonesia

28May 15

Mark Cammack, Adriaan Bedner, and Stijn van Huis

Abstract: This article examines the developments in Indonesian family law in the aftermath of the political transition that occurred in 1998. Its focus is on the position of the Islamic courts and the role of the women’s movement as a driver of reform. Continue reading →

Framing Rights: Women and Family Law in Pre- and Post- Revolutionary Iran

27May 15

Arzoo Osanloo

Abstract: This article explores changes to Iran’s family law codes before and after the 1979 revolution. Since the revolution, the state’s attention to women’s legal status has served to reinforce specific and often competing views on women’s roles in the post-revolutionary Islamic Republic of Iran. Continue reading →

Women’s Rights in Tunisia and the Democratic Renegotiation of an Authoritarian Legacy

22May 15

Maaike Voorhoeve

Abstract: Since the 2011 revolution, Tunisia has been negotiating what it is to become, a process of rebirth in which women’s rights is key. The ongoing debates reflect a confrontation between the feminist policies of Habib Bourguiba (the first president of the Tunisian republic) and alternative notions of women’s rights. Continue reading →

A Revolution in Muslim Family Law? Egypt’s Pre- and Post-Revolutionary Period (2011-2013) Compared

20May 15

Nadia Sonneveld and Monika Lindbekk

Abstract: In the weeks following the Egyptian revolution of 2011, a group of divorced fathers rose to demand a “revolution in family law.” Portraying extant family law provisions as symbolic of the old regime and as deviating from the principles of shariʿa, their call was given prominent media attention and, in the ensuing transitional period (2011 to 2013), women’s rights and family law emerged as contentious areas in Egypt. Continue reading →

Introduction: Shariʿa in Revolution? A Comparative Overview of Pre- and Post-Revolutionary Developments in Shariʿa-Based Family Law Legislation in Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, and Tunisia

19May 15

Nadia Sonneveld

Editor’s Note: Over the next two weeks, NMES will publish a series of articles about the relationship between family law and revolution in Egypt, Tunisia, Indonesia, and Iran. Nadia Sonneveld edited this series and she also introduces it in the following article.

Continue reading →

Where the AKP Stands: A Manifesto-Based Approach to Party Competition in Turkey

26Mar 15

Salih Bayram

Abstract: Using the Manifesto Project’s dataset, this article considers two questions: Where does the AKP stand vis-à-vis other parties in Turkey? What were the dynamics of party competition in recent Turkish elections? Continue reading →

From Şikayet to Political Discourse and ‘Public Opinion’: Petitioning Practices to the King-Crane Commission

18Feb 14

Yuval Ben-Bassat and Fruma Zachs

Abstract: The King-Crane Commission, named after its two chairs, Henry Churchill King (1858-1934) and Charles R. Crane (1858-1939), was an American investigative commission set up to explore possible political arrangements for the former Ottoman Empire in the aftermath of World War I and the collapse of the Empire. While most research has dealt with the issue of whether the petitions submitted to the King-Crane Commission were a genuine manifestation of ‘public opinion’ or merely manipulations by interested elite parties, this article shifts the focus beyond this debate. Continue reading →

The Impact of ‘Biblical Orientalism’ in Late Nineteeth- and Early Twentieth-Century Palestine

30Jan 14

Lorenzo Kamel

Abstract: ‘Biblical Orientalism’ can be defined as a phenomenon based on the combination of a selective use of religion and a simplifying way to approach its natural habitat: the ‘Holy Land’. Between the 1830s and the beginning of the 20th century this attitude triggered a flood of mainly British books, private diaries and maps. Continue reading →

Rebellion, Sectarian Slaughter or Civil War? Reading the Syrian Mêlée

12Jul 13

A review article by José Ciro Martínez

Texts reviewed:

Fouad Ajami, The Syrian Rebellion (Stanford: Hoover Institution Press, 2012).

Samar Yazbek, A Woman in the Crossfire: Diaries of the Syrian Revolution, trans. Max Weiss (London: Haus Publishing, 2012).

Stephen Starr, Revolt in Syria: Eye-Witness to the Uprising (London: C Hurst & Co, 2012).

Bassam Haddad, Business Networks in Syria: The Political Economy of Authoritarian Resilience (Stanford: Standford University Press, 2012). Continue reading →