Society

The ʿUlamāʾ and the Arab Uprisings 2011-13: Considering Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the ‘Global Mufti,’ between the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamic Legal Tradition, and Qatari Foreign Policy

21Mar 14

David H. Warren

Abstract: This article aims to explore emerging trends for the Sunni religious elite and the Islamic legal tradition in the new context of the Arab Uprisings by focusing on Yusuf al-Qaradawi, arguably the most prominent of these ʿulamāʾ alive today. Continue reading →

From Şikayet to Political Discourse and ‘Public Opinion’: Petitioning Practices to the King-Crane Commission

18Feb 14

Yuval Ben-Bassat and Fruma Zachs

Abstract: The King-Crane Commission, named after its two chairs, Henry Churchill King (1858-1934) and Charles R. Crane (1858-1939), was an American investigative commission set up to explore possible political arrangements for the former Ottoman Empire in the aftermath of World War I and the collapse of the Empire. While most research has dealt with the issue of whether the petitions submitted to the King-Crane Commission were a genuine manifestation of ‘public opinion’ or merely manipulations by interested elite parties, this article shifts the focus beyond this debate. Continue reading →

The Impact of ‘Biblical Orientalism’ in Late Nineteeth- and Early Twentieth-Century Palestine

30Jan 14

Lorenzo Kamel

Abstract: ‘Biblical Orientalism’ can be defined as a phenomenon based on the combination of a selective use of religion and a simplifying way to approach its natural habitat: the ‘Holy Land’. Between the 1830s and the beginning of the 20th century this attitude triggered a flood of mainly British books, private diaries and maps. Continue reading →

Mass Violence in Syria: A Preliminary Analysis

8Oct 13

Uğur Ümit Üngör

Abstract: This article discusses the forms of state-orchestrated violence in Syria between March 2011 and the summer of 2013 and offers some explanations for the logic, scope, and direction of this violence. Continue reading →

Immunity to the Arab Spring? Fear, Fatigue and Fragmentation in Algeria

7Jan 13

Edward McAllister

Abstract:  Rather than asking why the Arab Spring has not spread to Algeria, a question that necessitates a comparative approach, this paper will argue that the localised protests that have become a familiar feature of Algerian life for over half a decade respond to Algerian dynamics and have continued to do so in the wake of the Arab Spring. Continue reading →

Rethinking neo-Salafism through an Emerging Fiqh of Citizenship: The Changing Status of Minorities in the Discourse of Yusuf al-Qaradawi and the ‘School of the Middle Way’

29Oct 12

David H. Warren and Christine Gilmore

This quick study shows that while al-Qaradawi’s early work on the citizenship status of non-Muslims was neo-traditionalist in that it advocated retaining the dhimma system, he has since moved away from this position and is actively engaged in the process of developing an innovative and inclusive theory of “Islamic Citizenship” Continue reading →

The Ideological Framing of the National Outlook Parties in Turkey

11Apr 12

Feriha Perekli

Abstract: This paper unpacks the ideological framing of the National Outlook (NO) parties in Turkey, focusing on the National Order Party and the National Salvation Party during the 1970s, and the Welfare Party between the years 1983 and 1991. Rejecting violence for the purpose of bringing Continue reading →

From Medina to Runnymede: Comparing the Foundational Legacies of the Constitution of Medina and the Magna Carta

16Nov 11

Jeremy Kleidosty

Abstract: Identifying an Islamic constitutional tradition can be controversial due to orthodox Muslim understandings of God’s sovereignty and agency. Further complicating such discussions are arguments surrounding Continue reading →

An Alternative Representation of Femininity in 1920s Lebanon: Through the Mise-en-Abîme of a Masculine Space.

15Jun 11

Yasmine Nachabe focuses on this 1920s photograph by Marie al-Khazen: Two Women Dressed up in Men’s Suits. Continue reading →

Islam and Dispute Resolution in Central Asia: The Case of Women Muslim Leaders.

15Jun 11

David E. Merrell.

This quick study highlights the need for future research among Muslim leaders, especially women leaders (otinoyi singular; otinoyilar plural), on the neglected topic of how Islam influences dispute resolution in Central Asia. Continue reading →