Society

Women’s Rights in Tunisia and the Democratic Renegotiation of an Authoritarian Legacy

22May 15

Maaike Voorhoeve

Abstract: Since the 2011 revolution, Tunisia has been negotiating what it is to become, a process of rebirth in which women’s rights is key. The ongoing debates reflect a confrontation between the feminist policies of Habib Bourguiba (the first president of the Tunisian republic) and alternative notions of women’s rights. Continue reading →

A Revolution in Muslim Family Law? Egypt’s Pre- and Post-Revolutionary Period (2011-2013) Compared

20May 15

Nadia Sonneveld and Monika Lindbekk

Abstract: In the weeks following the Egyptian revolution of 2011, a group of divorced fathers rose to demand a “revolution in family law.” Portraying extant family law provisions as symbolic of the old regime and as deviating from the principles of shariʿa, their call was given prominent media attention and, in the ensuing transitional period (2011 to 2013), women’s rights and family law emerged as contentious areas in Egypt. Continue reading →

Introduction: Shariʿa in Revolution? A Comparative Overview of Pre- and Post-Revolutionary Developments in Shariʿa-Based Family Law Legislation in Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, and Tunisia

19May 15

Nadia Sonneveld

Editor’s Note: Over the next two weeks, NMES will publish a series of articles about the relationship between family law and revolution in Egypt, Tunisia, Indonesia, and Iran. Nadia Sonneveld edited this series and she also introduces it in the following article.

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United They Stand? A Study of Authoritarian Responses during the Arab Spring

23Apr 15

Julien Morency-Laflamme and Anja Brunner

Abstract: This article seeks to analyse why mass protests during the Arab Spring of 2010 did not always result in the toppling of authoritarian leaders and why in some cases it actually led to the reinforcement of certain authoritarian regimes. Continue reading →

From the Mosque to the Polls: The Emergence of the Al Nour Party in Post-Arab Spring Egypt

7Aug 14

Laurence Deschamps-Laporte

Abstract: In this paper, I examine the rise of the Al Nour Salafi party that won 27 percent of the vote in the 2011 Egyptian parliamentary elections. I present a new explanation for their popularity based on the analysis of ethnographic data collected in Alexandria. Continue reading →

After ‘Security First’: An analysis of security transition and ‘statebuilding’ in the West Bank 2007-11

13Jun 14

Philip Leech

Abstract: The Palestinian Authority’s (PA) imposition of order after the end of the al-Aqsa Intifada has been generally interpreted as a success. Not only did the PA consolidate its power in the West Bank and restore good relations with Israel and the West, it also appeared to obtain popular legitimacy by cracking down on its political opponents. Continue reading →

The ʿUlamāʾ and the Arab Uprisings 2011-13: Considering Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the ‘Global Mufti,’ between the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamic Legal Tradition, and Qatari Foreign Policy

21Mar 14

David H. Warren

Abstract: This article aims to explore emerging trends for the Sunni religious elite and the Islamic legal tradition in the new context of the Arab Uprisings by focusing on Yusuf al-Qaradawi, arguably the most prominent of these ʿulamāʾ alive today. Continue reading →

From Şikayet to Political Discourse and ‘Public Opinion’: Petitioning Practices to the King-Crane Commission

18Feb 14

Yuval Ben-Bassat and Fruma Zachs

Abstract: The King-Crane Commission, named after its two chairs, Henry Churchill King (1858-1934) and Charles R. Crane (1858-1939), was an American investigative commission set up to explore possible political arrangements for the former Ottoman Empire in the aftermath of World War I and the collapse of the Empire. While most research has dealt with the issue of whether the petitions submitted to the King-Crane Commission were a genuine manifestation of ‘public opinion’ or merely manipulations by interested elite parties, this article shifts the focus beyond this debate. Continue reading →

The Impact of ‘Biblical Orientalism’ in Late Nineteeth- and Early Twentieth-Century Palestine

30Jan 14

Lorenzo Kamel

Abstract: ‘Biblical Orientalism’ can be defined as a phenomenon based on the combination of a selective use of religion and a simplifying way to approach its natural habitat: the ‘Holy Land’. Between the 1830s and the beginning of the 20th century this attitude triggered a flood of mainly British books, private diaries and maps. Continue reading →

Mass Violence in Syria: A Preliminary Analysis

8Oct 13

Uğur Ümit Üngör

Abstract: This article discusses the forms of state-orchestrated violence in Syria between March 2011 and the summer of 2013 and offers some explanations for the logic, scope, and direction of this violence. Continue reading →