Details

Name
Ms. Angela Gissi
Address 1
Position
PhD Candidate
Country
Ireland
Email
a.gissi29@gmail.com
EURAMES Member
No
AFMA Member
No
MESA Member
No
BASIS Member
No
Discipline 1
Geography
Discipline 2
Politics (Political Science)
Discipline 3
Internal (state-internal) politics
Geographical Area 1
Syria
Geographical Area 2
Lebanon
Middle Eastern Area
Fertile Crescent
Languages Mastered
Italian
Proficiency
Fluent
Languages Mastered
Spanish
Proficiency
Operational
Languages Mastered
Levantine
Proficiency
Advanced
Languages Mastered
English
Proficiency
Fluent
Languages Mastered
French
Proficiency
Fluent
Qualifications
MA in Oriental Languages and Civilization (Arabic) received in 2005 from university ‘L’Orientale’ in Naples, Italy
Early Career Researcher
Yes
Biography
In 2005 I received my MA in Oriental Languages and Civilization (Arabic) from university ‘L’Orientale’ in Naples, Italy. In 2007 I obtained my post-graduate Diploma in Editorial and Literary Translation from Arabic into Italian at the ‘Scuola Superiore Mediatori Linguistici’ in Vicenza, Italy. As part of my academic training, I travelled extensively to Syria and Lebanon where I also volunteered with a number of international organizations that promote social justice for refugees and other vulnerable people. In 2014 I was a Research Affiliate at the American University of Beirut and the Notre Dame University-Louaize in Lebanon.
Research description
The 2011 uprising in Syria has seen women’s participation in demonstrations and their mobilization for justice and political reforms. While their political agency has often been regarded internationally as being an exceptional manifestation of ‘subaltern awakening’, in general, country specialists have analysed the conflict by focusing on the behaviour of (male) political leaders and the macro-level processes triggered by their decisions. Against this backdrop, Syrian women’s narratives of the conflict have been marginalized, silenced and depoliticized. Even before the outbreak of the civil war, the experience of ‘the political’ in the lives of ordinary Syrian people, in particular women, has rarely been investigated by scholars and pundits. Contrary to this approach, my research explores women’s political agency and highlights the centrality of their narratives to reflections on authoritarianism, warfare, and exile in multi-sectarian and consociational Lebanon. In my study I identify the factors that have influenced Syrian women's political awareness and seek to determine how their understandings of ‘the political’ have changed with the shift from peace to war and from domestic politics to politics in exile. I draw from feminist attempts to redefine the notion of ‘the political’ in order to transcend the realm of formal politics and encompass the many forms of power that impinge upon women’s lives. The analysis of my research data has allowed me to establish that political awareness is a survival strategy for Syrian women in politically charged environments where individuals' security is strictly connected with their consciousness and perception of ‘the political’. Within these contexts, I argue that women’s politicization does not necessarily express itself in activism or hidden forms of opposition to overarching powers. Rather, it also emerges from women’s attempts to shun state politics and other oppressive forces by strategizing their knowledge of the political
Additional Info 1
Women's political agency
Additional Info 2
Middle East (Syria and Lebanon)
External Funders
0
Contemporary Relevance