Details

Name
Mr Joe Worthington
Address 1
Position
Doctoral Researcher
Country
United Kingdom
Email
jw722@exeter.ac.uk
Personal Website
www.travellingpolitico.uk
LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com/in/joe-worthington/
EURAMES Member
No
AFMA Member
No
MESA Member
No
BASIS Member
No
Institution Name
University of Exeter Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies
Institution Address 1
Stocker Road
Institution Address 2
Streatham Campus
Institution City
Exeter
Institution County
Devon
Institution Postcode
EX4 4ND
Institution Country
United Kingdom
Discipline 1
Military History
Discipline 2
Law
Discipline 3
Political economy
Discipline 4
Foreign policy
Geographical Area 1
Bahrain
Geographical Area 2
Qatar
Geographical Area 3
Oman
Geographical Area 4
United Arab Emirates
Middle Eastern Area
The Arabian Peninsula
Languages Mastered
Gulf
Proficiency
Elementary
Qualifications
MRes in Middle East Studies (IAIS, University of Exeter) MA in Politics & International Relations of the Middle East (IAIS, University of Exeter) BScEcon (hons) in International Politics & Military History (Department of International Politics, Aberystwyth University)
Early Career Researcher
Yes
Biography
I am currently an ESRC funded Doctoral researcher at the University of Exeter, researching primarily the economic, legal, political and military legacy of the British Persian Gulf Residency from its inception in 1763 to the present day. I also hold a BScEcon in International Politics and Military History from Aberystwyth University and an MA in Politics and International Relations of the Middle East from the University of Exeter. A major focus of my research is centred on historic economic migration in the Gulf and its impact upon society. I am also senior editor of a political journal and a travel journalist.
Research description
The primary aim of my research is to assess the economic, legal, political, and military legacy of the United Kingdom in the Arabian Gulf. My research assesses the history of Britain’s influence in the Gulf from 1820, when various agreements were signed with the Gulf rulers which guaranteed British protection of their interests against Qawasim piracy, through to the Exclusive Agreements which were signed to prevent the Gulf rulers from ceding land or having relations with non-British Empire states, and to 1968 when Britain told the Gulf rulers about her intention to withdraw from the region, from which prolonged negotiations followed and the UAE federation emerged. Based on this history legacy in the region, my research contextualises contemporary Anglo-Gulf economic relations, legal relations, political relations, and military relations with the Gulf states today. As Britain formed and governed each of these areas throughout her 151-years in the region. Using interviews with relevant practitioners in each of these fields, former diplomats, and other relevant people, my research addresses one of the most important relationships in modern times, the relationship between the United Kingdom of the 21st century and one of her former most influential and wealthiest non-colonial protectorate regions. Linked to this research, I also assess the transition from pre-withdrawal coercion to post-withdrawal cooperation between the UK and Gulf rulers.
Recent publications
BRISMES Conference 2017 paper presentation: 'Qatar’s Indian Question: What impact has Qatar’s large Indian migrant population had on the recognised boundaries of the Gulf State?'
Additional Info 1
Anglo-Gulf Relations
Additional Info 2
British history in the Gulf region
External Funders
0
Contemporary Relevance