Details

Name
Ms. Abir Chaaban
Address 1
Position
PhD Student
Country
Canada
Email
abir.a.chaaban@gmail.com
EURAMES Member
No
AFMA Member
No
MESA Member
Yes
BASIS Member
No
Institution Name
Lancaster University
Institution Address 1
Bailrigg, Lancaster
Institution City
Bailrigg
Institution County
Lancaster
Institution Postcode
LA1 4YW
Institution Country
United Kingdom
Discipline 1
Multidisciplinary
Geographical Area 1
Lebanon
Languages Mastered
English
Proficiency
Fluent
Languages Mastered
Hebrew
Proficiency
Elementary
Languages Mastered
French
Proficiency
Operational
Languages Mastered
Levantine
Proficiency
Fluent
Early Career Researcher
Yes
Biography
Abir is a PhD Student joining Lancaster University program in Politics, Philosophy and Religion in October 2018. Her research works with the interaction between political communication, public diplomacy and conflict in the Levant. She works with a framework those bridges between Harold Innis and Michel Foucault. Particularly she works with enunciation as a function of discourse, and the circularization of power at the margins. Her focus is on post-discourse analysis around militarization within civil conflict. She is an ethnographer working with discourse as it is being produced within actual fields of conflict with a particular attention n Lebanon, Israel and Syria. She holds a B.S. in Liberal Studies from the University of the State of New York which is affiliated with the Lebanese American University. Her MA was in Interdisciplinary Studies combines the disciplines of international relations, international law and history - York University- Canada-2008.
Research description
My PhD research was motivated by participant observations collected for the purpose of an article related to the August 2015 riots associated with the “garbage crisis” in Lebanon. Slogans posted as video clips on social media, and held as banners in the protest targeted the confessionalism, of the political parties of the establishment. The significant observation about the division in identity at the riots is its relation to a historical pattern of emergence of anti-establishment political parties targeting confessionalism. The hypothesis my research works with is that this division relates to what has been identified by scholars in Middle Eastern Studies as the Shiʿa “identity crisis.” Analysis of the Shiʿa identity crisis in the litterature imagine the existence of a crises in the coherence of historical continuity between the confessional regularization of the identity Shiʿa endowed on them by the government after the creation of the State of Lebanon in the early twentieth century, and the their historical regulated identity Metwali endowed on them by the government of the Arab Conquest. The objective of my research is to reconstruct relations around the processes constructing the identity crisis in the literature to reveal the conflict of identity associated with this crisis, and then analyze current events of mass mobilization by bringing these two conflicting identities into analysis. My analysis employs a cyber ethnographic research design that empirically bridges between Michel Foucault’s framework of analysis, articulated in The Archeology of Knowledge (1972) and The Subject and Power (1982) and applied in Society Must Be Defended (1997), and Harold Innis’ analysis of the power relations between the center and the periphery in Empire and Communication and The Bias of Communication (1951). My research uses mixed methods of data collection. Data is captured from social media and classified by utilizing NVivo qualitative research software.
Recent publications
(R). Chaaban, Abir A. ( fall, 2017), “Incoherence in the Process of Transformation of the Metwali into Jaʿfari Shiʿa and the Consequent Militant Mobilization of Twelver Shiʿa. Journal of Interdisciplinary Middle Eastern Studies. Vol.1, pp. 127-155, https://doi.org/10.26351/2017.6 Chaaban, A. (2008). Sovereignty, State Legitimacy and the Nation State: The Case of Lebanon. Toronto: York University, MA Thesis. Saarbrucken: LAP Lambert, 2016.
Additional Info 1
Politics, Religion and Philosophy
External Funders
0
Contemporary Relevance